Rooted in the Countryside

David Collier Rural Planning is a planning consultancy specialising in rural development, including development on farms.

We practise mainly in the West Midlands, but are prepared to take on projects elsewhere in the country, Within two months of launch, the Practice had clients in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire.

David Collier is a Chartered Town Planner experienced in all aspects of planning as it affects agriculture, horticulture and rural estates, and has a decade’s experience as National Planning Adviser to the National Farmers’ Union of England and Wales.

We believe…

The aim of a planning consultancy should be to secure the best and most appropriate development for a site, meeting the client’s requirements in a way that respects the natural and other constraints of the location and takes account of the views and needs of others.

This is normally best achieved through negotiation rather than confrontation. The aim of David Collier Rural Planning is to secure the best outcome in every case, providing the highest levels of service along the way.

Client Feedback
Have you used David Collier Rural Planning? We would love to have your feedback.


One thing that caught my eye was the deletion of a reference to ‘innovative’ in the sub-paragraph on isolated new dwellings (now para 80, NPPF); the likely change was flagged up a while ago. It was always problematic, as last year’s cutting edge is next year’s mainstream. 2 of 2.

The NPPF changes likely to interest clients are more emphasis on beautiful buildings (and trees), some tidying up and updating, and new annex on flood vulnerability. And the 'Grand Designs' change. 1 of 2.

It's that time of the year, when ministers and civil servants hit pre-hols deadlines. MHCLG has published changes to the National Planning Policy Framework and final version of its new National Model Design Code, and announced its new design advisory body, the Office for Place.

Jenrick: Post-war urban #planning has 'been a disaster' http://planningresource.co.uk/article/1722666/

I can't help thinking that the housing secretary has a point when he says that at times post-war planning in cities has been a disaster. And not just in England. On our recent tour of Scotland, the only post-war building we sought out was V&A in Dundee.

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